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abstracts 2021

Abstracts of Peer-reviewed Papers:


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Current Volume - (133) 2021:

133(1):

FOURTH UPDATE TO A CHECKLIST OF THE LEPIDOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 2013
1 DAVID J. L. AGASSIZ, 2 S. D. BEAVAN & 1 R. J. HECKFORD
1 Department of Life Sciences, Division of Insects, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD
2 The Hayes, Zeal Monachorum, Devon EX17 6DF
Abstract
This update incorporates information published since 30 November 2019 and before 1 January 2021 into A Checklist of the Lepidoptera of the British Isles, 2013.

HYDRAECIA OSSEOLA (STAUDINGER, 1882) (NOCTUIDAE) AND ARAEOPTERON ECPHAEA HAMPSON, 1940 (EREBIDAE) NEW FOR THE FAUNA OF CROATIA
TONI KOREN
Association Hyla, I. Lipovac 7, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia E-mail: koren.toni1@gmail.com
Abstract
During a moth survey of Neretva river Delta, southern Croatia, two interesting Noctuoidea species were recorded for the first time in the country. Hydraecia osseola was recorded close to Metkovic, some 450 km from the nearest known populations in northern Italy.
Araeopteron ecphaea was recorded near Neretva river mouth, about 500 km NW from the closest localities in Greece, Romania and Bulgaria. Both species have a disjunct distribution in Europe and these records represent a drastic increase in their range. These records support the value of the Neretva river Delta as an important part of Ecological Network Natura 2000 as well as one of designated Ramsar sites, as a refugium for wetland moth species in the
Adriatic coastline.
Key words: Neretva river delta, Noctuidae, Erebidae, moths, distribution, wetland species.

PARACOSSULUS THRIPS (HÜBNER, 1818) (LEP. COSSIDAE) RE-DISCOVERED IN BULGARIA WITH NOTES OF SOME OTHER
SURPRISING FINDINGS IN THE DRAGOMAN NATURA 2000 PROTECTED AREA
STOYAN BESHKOV& ANA NAHIRNIc-BESHkOVA
National Museum of Natural History, Tsar Osvoboditel Blvd.1, 1000 Sofia, Bulgaria stoyan.beshkov@gmail.com; ananahirnic@nmnhs.com
Abstract
Paracossulus (=Catopta) thrips, a species listed in Annex II of the Council Directive 92/43/EEC (Code: 4028), considered as extinct in Bulgaria, is re-discovered after more than 25 years in an isolated locality remote from previous sites. Some other rare and interesting
species found in the same locality are commented on and illustrated; for some, this locality is at the edge of their range.
Keywords: Lepidoptera, Paracossulus thrips, Habitat Directive, protected species, faunistics.

THE MACRO-MOTHS OF ASTON ROWANT NATIONAL NATURE RESERVE, OXFORDSHIRE
PAUL WARING
Shire, Tydd Bank, Sutton Bridge, Spalding, Lincs., PE12 9XE paul_waring@btinternet.com
Abstract
This article reviews the recording of macro-moths at Aston Rowant National Nature Reserve, Oxfordshire, since 1890. The all-time total list of the 348 species macro-moths known from the site is presented. Species for which the reserve is particularly important and those for
which there are no recent records are separately indicated.
Keywords: moth recording, historical species list, Aston Rowant National Nature Reserve,
oxfordshire, England.

LIMNEPHILUS PATI O’CONNOR (TRICH.: LIMNEPHILIDAE), A CADDISFLY NEW TO SCOTLAND
1 ROBIN D. SUTTON, 2 IAN D. WALLACE & 3 JAMES P. o’CONNOR
17 Bualadubh, Eochar, Isle of South Uist HS8 5RQ, United Kingdom. (E-mail: robin.d.sutton@googlemail.com)
2National Museums Liverpool World Museum, William Brown Street L3 8EN3, United Kingdom. (e-mail: Ian.Wallace@liverpoolmuseums.org.uk)
3Emeritus Entomologist, National Museum of Ireland – Natural History, Merrion Street, Dublin 2, D02 F627, Ireland. (e-mail: joconnor@museum.ie)
Abstract
In 2020, a male Limnephilus pati o’Connor, 1980 was taken in a light-trap on South Uist in the outer Hebrides. The species is new to Scotland and it was previously presumed extinct in Great Britain. The island has the largest machair system in the British Isles and the caddisfly may be associated with the resultant calcareous conditions there.
Key words: caddisfly, Trichoptera, Limnephilus pati, first record, South Uist, outer Hebrides,
Scotland, machair
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