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abstracts 2019

Abstracts of Peer-reviewed Papers:


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Current Volume - (131) 2019:

131(1):

SECOND UPDATE TO THE CHECKLIST OF THE LEPIDOPTERA OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 2013
1 DAVID J. L. AGASSIZ, 2 S. D. BEAVAN & 1 R. J. HECKFORD
1 Department of Life Sciences, Division of Insects, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD
2 The Hayes, Zeal Monachorum, Devon EX17 6DF
Abstract
This update incorporates information published since 26 March 2016 and before 20 November 2018 into A Checklist of the Lepidoptera of the British Isles, 2013.

TRACHYPEPLA CONTRITELLA (WALKER, 1864) (LEP.: OECOPHORIDAE) NEW TO BRITAIN
ANDY BANTHORPE
32 Long Close, Lower Stondon, Bedfordshire SG16 6JS (E-mail vc30moths@picus.co.uk)
Abstract
Trachypepla contritella (Walker) is added to the British list from six individuals in lighttraps in Bedfordshire and Huntingdonshire in 2012 and 2018.
Keywords. Britain, Bedfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Lepidoptera, Oecophoridae, Trachypepla.

OBSERVATIONS OF OVERWINTERING TISSUES TRIPHOSA DUBITATA L. (LEP.: GEOMETRIDAE) IN SOUTH-EAST SCOTLAND
1 KATTY BAIRD & 2 MARK CUBITT
1 4 Rhodes Holdings, North Berwick EH39 5PH (E-mail: kattybaird@gmail.com) corresponding author
2 12 Burgh Mills Lane, Linlithgow, EH49 7TA
Abstract
Adult Tissue Triphosa dubitata L. (Lep.: Geometridae) were monitored in caves and mines in Berwickshire and Haddingtonshire between August 2017 and April 2018. Peak activity and numbers were observed during September, after which numbers fell and only eight individuals, all females, were recorded in the spring 2018. No males were recorded after October. Through regular visits to overwintering sites and identification of individuals based on unique wing markings, this study revealed that Tissue numbers in Scotland are much higher than previously thought.
Key Words: Tissue, Triphosa dubitata, Scotland, overwintering, hibernation

THE CADDISFLY HYDROPSYCHE FULVIPES (CURTIS, 1834) (TRICHOPTERA: HYDROPSYCHIDAE): FINALLY CONFIRMED
AS AN IRISH SPECIES
1 JAMES P. O’CONNOR, 1 MARY A. O’CONNOR AND 2 MARTIN P. GAMMELL
1 c/o National Museum of Ireland – Natural History, Merrion Street, Dublin 2, D02 F627, Ireland.(e-mail: joconnor@museum.ie)
2 Marine and Freshwater Research Centre, Department of Natural Sciences, Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Galway, H91 T8NW, Ireland.(e-mail: martin.gammell@gmit.ie)
Abstract
A female adult of Hydropsyche fulvipes (Curtis, 1834) (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) was collected at a small stream in Edenvale, County Wexford, confirming the presence of the species in Ireland. Previous Irish larval records of the species are discussed.
Key words: Trichoptera, caddisfly, Hydropsyche fulvipes, adult, species confirmed, Ireland.

A POSSIBLE LEAF BLOTCH MINER MOTH (LEPIDOPTERA: GRACILLARIITES) FROM MID-EOCENE BALTIC AMBER
MARTIN J. F. FOWLER
Les Rocquettes, Orchard Road, South Wonston, Winchester SO21 3EX E-mail: danebury216@hotmail.co.uk
Abstract
A micro-moth fossil from a specimen of Mid-Eocene Baltic amber is described and
tentatively identified as a leaf blotch miner from the Lepidopteran family Gracillariidae Stainton, 1854 and belonging to the genus Gracillariites Kozlov, 1987. The good quality of the fossil, including the preservation of wing scales, graphically illustrates the ability
of Baltic amber to preserve in exquisite detail insect remains dating from over 41 million years ago.
Keywords: Lepidoptera, fossil micromoth, Gracillariidae, Gracillariites, Baltic amber, Middle Eocene.

131(2):

A CONTRIBUTION TO KNOWLEDGE OF THE BALKAN LEPIDOPTERA: SPECIES COLLECTED IN THE AUTUMN OF 2018 IN ALBANIA (MACROLEPIDOPTERA WITH SOME CRAMBIDAE)
1 STOYAN BESHKOV & 2 ANA NAHIRNIC
1, 2 National Museum of Natural History, Tsar Osvoboditel Blvd.1, 1000 Sofia, Bulgaria
(E-mails: 1 stoyan.beshkov@gmail.com; 2 ananahirnic@nmnhs.com)

131(3):

OBSERVATIONS ON THE LARVA AND FOODPLANTS OF LOBESIA RELIQUANA (HÜBNER, [1825]) (LEP.: TORTRICIDAE,
OLETHREUTINAE)
¹ S. D. BEAVAN AND ² R. J. HECKFORD
¹ The Hayes, Zeal Monachorum, Devon EX17 6DF ² Department of Life Sciences, Division of Insects, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (Correspondence address: 67 Newnham Road, Plympton, Plymouth, Devon PL7 4AW)
Abstract
This paper considers accounts of the larva and larval foodplants of Lobesia reliquana (Hübner, [1825]) in British and mainland European literature as a result of finding larvae in withered brown leaves of Hornbeam Carpinus betulus L. and oak Quercus sp. in Devon, England. Certain cited foodplants are considered to be erroneous or requiring confirmation. Only a few larval descriptions are considered to be reliable.
Key words: Lepidoptera, Tortricidae, Lobesia reliquana, larva, foodplants, Carpinus betulus, Quercus sp., dead leaves.

THE BOX-TREE MOTH CYDALIMA PERSPECTALIS (WALKER, 1859) IN BRITAIN: AN OVERVIEW OF ITS SPREAD AND
CURRENT STATUS
1 COLIN W. PLANT, 2 CHRIS POOLE, 3 ANDREW SALISBURY& 3 STEPHANIE BIRD
1 Corresponding Author: 14 West Road, Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 3QP
2 European Boxwood and Topiary Society (UK), PO Box 256 Stroud GL5 5WZ
3 Plant Health (Entomology), Royal Horticultural Society, Wisley, Surrey GU23 6QB
Guest Editor: DAVID J. L. AGASSIZ
Abstract
The arrival of Cydalima perspectalis (Walker, 1859) (Lep.: Crambidae) in the British Isles in 2007 and its subsequent geographical spread to the end of 2018 are documented. Earliest reports might relate to wandering adults from Europe, but the establishment of a breeding population is most likely a consequence of accidental importation of preimaginal stages in association with the larval foodplant of Box, primarily Buxus sempervirens, which is also a native British tree. Once established the adults are capable of significant dispersal, in both sexes, so that continued range expansion does not depend on further importations. The spread of the species from 2007 to 2018 is illustrated by a series of distribution maps. The moth now affects all of England apart from the far northwest and has established a foothold in both South and North Wales, though much of that Principality is, apparently, unaffected at present. In Scotland, the moth is known from
the south-east in Fifeshire, but is likely to spread. The pest status and potential control measures are discussed briefly.
Keywords: Box-tree Moth, Cydalima perspectalis, Buxus sempervirens, invasive species, introduced species, pest species.

CNEPHIDIA FUSCORUBRA RIEL, 1928, DESCRIBED FROM FRANCE: A NEW SYNONYM OF ALOPHIA COMBUSTELLA
(HERRICH-SCHÄFFER, 1855) (LEP.: PYRALIDAE, PHYCITINAE)
FRANTIŠEK SLAMKA
Racianska 61, SK-83102 Bratislava, Slovakia (Email: f.slamka@nextra.sk)
Abstract
Cnephidia fuscorubra Riel, 1928, described from France, was examined and the results show that the female genitalia of the holotype are identical with Alophia combustella (Herrich-Schäffer, 1855). The holotype and its genitalia are illustrated.
Keywords: Cnephidia fuscorubra Riel, 1928, Alophia combustella (Herrich-Schäffer, 1855), new synonym.

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